How to Boost Your Immune System Against Illnesses Like Coronavirus

We’re hearing your concern about coronavirus and wanted to let you know…
WE’RE HERE FOR YOU!

We fully expect to stay open and allow our patients to stay on their current recommended treatment plan. Our message about obtaining maintaining your overall health and well-being hasn’t changed and it’s even more important now.

Rest assured that we always practice the highest standards for hygiene and cleanliness.

Here are a few reminders about how to boost your immune system as this novel virus spreads throughout our area.

  • Chiropractic Adjustments are proven to improve and enhance all your body’s systems, including your immune system. We fully expect to stay open to help keep you on your current treatment plan.
  • Wash your hands with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds. Be sure to clean between your fingers and under your fingernails. It’s the best defense we have against this virus.
  • Remember to eat whole, nutrient-dense foods. Fruits and vegetables are packed with the vitamins and minerals we need to support immune health. It's best to gain as much nutrition as you can from whole foods (ask us about our garden tower!). In the office, we have supplements and essential oils to give you that extra boost.
    • Juice Plus+ (Clinically Proven, Whole Food Based Nutritional Supplement)
    • Standard Process (Strengthen your immune system w/herbal supplements)
    • doTERRA Essential Oils (aid in immune support)
  • Drink plenty of filtered water. It keeps you hydrated and removes toxins from the body.
  • Get some exercise — and some rest, too! Moderate exercise and a healthy sleep schedule are critical to ensuring your immune system is operating at peak efficiency.
  • Detox your body! Through our Ion therapy footbaths, we can help remove impurities from your liver, kidneys, lungs, intestines, lymphatic system and skin, where toxins are stored.
  • Get a Massage! Build-up of stress can make you more prone to getting sick, so consider coming in for a massage. Massage has also been shown to improve the immune system, by promoting passive lymph movement.

We’re here to help you!

Call us for more information at (703) 450-4900.

micronutrients

The Importance of Micronutrients

micronutrientsThe holidays are a stressful time for a lot of people. From the pressure to give the perfect gift to the time crunch of fitting in all the holiday parties, a lot of people’s health takes a back seat.

As our stress increases, our ‘weak links’ come out — our treat-filled diets plus stress lead to inflammation in the gut and body, so health issues that you may normally have under control such as digestive issues, anxiety, aches and pains can all flare up. In fact, people can gain an average of 3 to 5 lbs. over the holiday season.

January is a great opportunity to get your body back in balance and start rebuilding with a good, clean system.

One of the best ways to do that is by adding micronutrients to your diet.

You’ve probably heard of the “big three” macronutrients — carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins — that your body needs to function. Micronutrients are all those vitamins and minerals that are necessary for things like keeping you energized, immune function, bone health, fluid balance and so much more. These can include vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin E, magnesium and zinc, to name a few.

When your body doesn’t get enough of these and other micronutrients, you may feel tired, in pain, foggy, depressed and otherwise run down.

One of the best ways to replenish these micronutrients is with a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, but with our busy lives, sometimes we’re too busy to get always have fresh produce on hand. Dr. Judy has a variety of concentrated fruit, vegetable and berry-based capsules and chewable tablets that are a great way to bridge the gap between what you do get and what you should get — and rebuild those all-important micronutrients.

If you’re interested in giving your body a great reset this January, ask Dr. Judy about her regimen and how you can reclaim your energy this winter.

Pixabay

Snow Shoveling Safety and Tips for Safe Winter Activities

The weekend forecast is calling for snow showers Saturday and Sunday with highs in the 30s and lows in the 20s, and Virginians know what that means: shoveling. Lots of shoveling.

While most recreational winter activities and chores are harmless, a select few can pose problems for outdoor enthusiasts. Injuries including concussions, dislocated shoulders, spinal strains, broken elbows, skier’s thumb, and ankle sprains are all possible from shoveling, skiing, sledding and ice skating.

According to the American Chiropractic Association, “Simply walking outside in the freezing weather without layers of warm clothing can intensify older joint problems and cause pain.”

So when you head outside this weekend, be sure that you are geared up – and warmed up.

Here’s a list of safety precautions for this weekend!

Snow Shoveling Safety

  • Layer clothing to keep your muscles warm. It is important to wear not only the amount of clothing you think you’ll need but enough to withstand the outdoors for longer than a few minutes.
  • Do warm-up stretches and moves before you head out, similar to what you would do before exercise. You may feel silly, but you’ll thank yourself when you go back inside. When you muscles are cold, they are more likely to be strained.
  • Avoid sudden twisting and turning motions. Go slow and be careful if you think there could be ice.
  • An ergonomic shovel can help take some of the strain off of clearing your sidewalk. No matter what type of shovel you use, bend your knees to lift when shoveling. Or, avoid lifting the show and shove it to the side when you can!
  • Stop immediately if you feel chest pain, get tired, or have shortness of breath. There is a correlation between shoveling snow and heart attacks, so be aware of how you’re feeling and call 911 if you think you’re having a cardiac event.

If you do strain your back or fall on ice this weekend, contact us!

If you plan to go skiing, sledding, ice skating or having a good old-fashioned snowball fight, here are tips on how to stay safe and healthy!

Hitting the Slopes

If you’re heading to a local ski resort, going ice skating or taking the kids sledding, here are a few tips from the American Chiropractic Association.

Warming up is not optional – it is essential. If you don’t have much time, it’s better to shorten the length of your workout and maintain a good warm-up than to skip it altogether. A good warm-up can be completed in 15-20 minutes and will make the transition into your chosen winter exercise much easier and more rewarding.

Skiing

  • Do 10 to 15 squats, standing with your legs shoulder-width apart and knees aligned over your feet.
  • Slowly lower your buttocks as you bend your knees over your feet.
  • Then, stand up straight again.
  • It’s a good idea to wear layers because you may be going from a cold environment (outdoors) to a warm environment (indoors).

Ice Skating

  • Perform several lunges.
  • Take a moderately advanced step with one foot and let your back knee come down to the floor while keeping your shoulders in position over your hips.
  • Repeat the process with your both feet.

Sledding:

  • Perform knee-to-chest stretches to fight compression injuries caused by repetitive bouncing over the snow.
  • While either sitting or lying on your back, pull your knees to your chest and hold for up to 30 seconds.

Remember: cool-down stretches are almost as important as warm-up stretches. Take your time. For instance, at the bottom of the sledding hill, before walking back up, do additional knee-to-chest stretches or repetitive squatting movements to recover flexibility.

Above all else – have fun! Happy snow day(s) to everyone from AFC.

 

What is text neck?

To the name’s suggestion, “text neck” is the recently diagnosed epidemic of the infamous head bent downward, shoulders slumped texting posture that has become universal in the digital age.

It is the body’s automatic response to handheld technology, yet it is not just synonymous with texting. It can also be seen when people use many other digital devices such as tablets or e-book readers, computers, nooks, and gaming system controllers.

Everything we, as a society, know and understand as the appropriate relationship between our bodies and our technology has become dangerous for our spines.

What are the side effects?

You’re likely to recognize the pain, a sensation of tightness and achiness in your neck and shoulders, before pinpointing the cause. Whether you play games on your smartphone during your morning commute, respond to emails for hours a day or stare at your GPS on a cross-country road trip, when left untreated, the pain of text neck can lead to chronic headaches and constant discomfort.

The human head weighs between 10 and 11 pounds, a heaviness which strains the back of the neck when pulled too far forward. According to recent studies, for every inch forward you hold your head, the weight carried down through the spine increases by 10 pounds. At a 45-degree angle, the typical angle that most people view their cellphones, the head weighs 49 pounds, at a 60-degree angle, another popular perspective, it weighs 60 pounds.

The pressure that is put on the front of the neck also causes the back to gap, which can produce intervertebral discs to mitigate backward, increasing the chance for disc bulges, a common spine injury. The back of the neck also becomes strained because the muscles in the backside are in a constant state of contraction while trying to pull and support the head, making the muscle tense. Text neck can also create a tightening on the front of the neck and chest, leading to dysfunction in the shoulders and middle of the back.

When to visit your chiropractor:

Most people are so encompassed with and reliant on their phones that they lose track of their posture throughout the day and become unaware of how they look from an outside perspective. According to The Washington Post, research shows that over time, text neck can lead to early wear-and-tear of the spine, degeneration, and even surgery.

If you are experiencing symptoms of text neck, even on a minimal scale, act now; don’t wait for the discomfort to increase so much that the pain is unlivable for daily functions.

In the early stages, it may not be necessary to visit a professional chiropractor. In addition to a series of adjustments, there are many exercises that can be done at home to help alleviate the pain and symptoms of text neck.

The best possible action to take is to spend as much, if not more time in the opposite postural position (of text neck) to counterbalance the downward/forward head motion. In other words, if you spend time during the day looking down at your phone, spend time in the evening on a stretch that elongates the spine backward, such as the exaggerated nod head gesture.

8 helpful exercises to combat text neck:

  1. Exaggerated Nod
  2. Downward-Facing Dog
  3. Cat-Cow
  4. Padahastasana
  5. Bow Pose
  6. Chin Tuck
  7. Pigeon Neck
  8. Chest Opening

All exercises can be found at these links: